Posts Tagged ‘VOLVO TRUCKS’

Volvo FH 16 700 from Brisbane Truck Show to WA

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Volvo FH 16 700

On Monday 9th of May, Andre Keune will drive his new Volvo FH16 700 horsepower truck off the Volvo stand at the Brisbane Truck Show and take it 4,500 kilometres across Australia to his base in Perth.


Andre Keune has been using Volvos, as part of his fleet, since he bought a Volvo F 12 back in the mid-1970s. His company Keune Transport is based in Perth but delivers all over Western Australia to places such as Port Hedland, Broome, and the communities in the Pilbara whose place-names are bywords of the Australian mining industry: Newman, Tom Price, Pannawonica, Brockman, Yandi, West Angelas, Area C and Hope Downs.

‘The journey to the mines is about 1,600 kilometres each way,’ says Andre, ‘and my drivers do that in 15-hour shifts in just under three days. They load ammonium nitrate from a fertilizer factory at Kwinana, south of Perth, which takes about four hours all up and then they’re off.’ The trucks go to the mines twice a week, every week.

The iron ore and gold miners of Western Australia use a lot of ammonium nitrate fertilizer, but it’s not for growing vegetables! They’re mixing it with diesel to make blasting explosives. Andre Keune’s Volvos deliver this most vital of mining tools, to some of the most remote and inaccessible parts of the country, in conditions that would challenge any truck. Meanwhile, Andre’s other trucks are hauling triple freezer trailers up to Broome, a 4,600 kilometre round trip.

Each of those trucks does six trips per month to Broome and are crewed by two-up driver teams. ‘They’re all long-distance trips and we’re hauling pretty big loads,’ says Andre. ‘The road trains carrying the nitrate are B-double tipper units with a 6-axle dogtrailer and a triple-tipper unit rated at 145 tonnes GCM, with a payload of over a 100 tonnes.

‘When we get the new (FH16) 700 out there we’re going to put a quad behind it rated at 168 tonnes GCM. With journeys this long, every tonne counts.’ So does fuel consumption. Having done the same journeys himself many hundreds of times and with the same drivers for many years, Andre has a very clear picture of the effect on fuel consumption of different engines and driver behaviours.
‘Two things I really like about the Volvos is their Volvo fuel consumption and Volvo supreme comfort,’ says Andre. ‘I ask my drivers to only have a 90 km/h cruising speed because I know that once you get above about 92 km/h, the fuel consumption goes up by about 7%. Couple that with Volvo’s economical engines and we’re talking about a lot of money saved.’

‘I’m thinking of taking the (FH16) 700 back to the hotel in Brisbane after the show and asking the valet to park it for me, ‘laughs Andre, ‘if this is going to be our swansong, we might as well go out in style.’

Volvo FH16 700 top billing at the Brisbane Truck Show

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

Pic: Volvo FH16 700 at the Brisbane Truck Show

General Manager of Volvo Trucks says the Volvo Truck stand will be a showcase of Volvo innovation in technology and safety.


Visitors to the Volvo Trucks stand at the Brisbane Truck Show 2011, will have the opportunity to see the jewel in the crown of the Volvo range, the FH16 700 powered by a massive 700hp engine, that develops 3150 Nm of torque. Gary says it also rules the roost when it comes to fuel economy, reliability and productivity. The FH16 700 is packed with advanced safety features and Gary says that safety has become a priority for smart transport operators.

“This is why Volvo puts such a big emphasis on safety, because it’s fundamental to every moment behind the wheel. We know that our trucks might have to thread a city’s streets one day and do a 1000-kilometre line haul the next. There are different safety considerations for every operating environment, and Volvo trucks are designed to handle all of them.”

Also on display at the show will be a unique roll-over simulator that gives visitors the opportunity to experience the effect of a roll-over first hand. The simulator cabin is a static device that hydraulically rolls 45º to the left and right. It has all the accessories of a real truck and visitors can feel the effects of tilting the cab through 90 degrees. Gary says this simulator demonstrates how critical the seatbelt is for saving lives.

“In some 50% of accidents in which the truck driver sustains injury, a roll-over sequence is involved. And, in at least 60% of accidents the use of a seatbelt would have reduced the injury sustained by the truck driver,” he says. “The seatbelt is the single most effective system for reducing the risk of injuries and fatalities – so I encourage all adults to experience the value of a seatbelt first hand at the Volvo Trucks stand.”

See Volvo Trucks at stand 52 in hall three.

Volvo Trucks delivers first EPA2010-certified trucks to Talon Logistics Inc.

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009
Volvo VN Daycabs EPA 2010 (certified)

Volvo VN Daycabs EPA 2010 (certified)

On November 17 Talon Logistics, Inc. USA, took delivery of its first EPA2010-certified trucks from Volvo Trucks in North America, with two more delivered since. Talon to date has ordered a total of 23 EPA’10 Volvo VN Daycabs for its fleet.
The delivered trucks are powered by Volvo D13 engines with 405 hp and 1450 lb-ft of torque, and Volvo I-Shift automated manual transmissions. The trucks rank the cleanest trucks in the world, since they are certified without the use of emissions credits.


Talon Logistics is the transportation division of Giant Eagle, Inc., Pittsburgh, a grocery chain with stores in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland. Working with Volvo Trucks, Talon has been a pioneer in field testing advanced emission control technologies. For the past seven years, the two companies have tested selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in real world operation in Talon’s fleet. The company also inaugurated Volvo Trucks’ EPA’10 customer field testing in September 2007.

EPA2010 diesel emissions standards are the most stringent in the world requiring near zero-emissions. By using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce NOx, Volvo meets these standards as well as improves fuel economy and reduces emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2. The use of SCR is already wide spread in Europe among other markets. Volvo Trucks is the first truck manufacturer to have its heavy-duty 11 and 13 liter diesel engines certified for 2010 by both EPA and CARB

Volvo Tests new BIO fuel for diesel engines

Saturday, September 19th, 2009
Volvo Bio Fuel ready for market

Volvo Bio Fuel ready for market

Volvo Trucks is now taking the next concrete step towards carbon dioxide-neutral road transport. Within the framework of a broad-based joint project, field tests are being conducted with 14 trucks running on Bio-DME – a fuel that combines a low environmental imprint with high energy efficiency.

In August 2007, Volvo Group unveiled seven demo trucks from Volvo Trucks each running on a different type of biofuel, one of which was DME (Di-Methyl-Ether). This initiative showed that Volvo has the technical solutions for running the efficient diesel engine on virtually all existing renewable fuels.

Today, in a joint project with actors including the EU, the Swedish Energy Agency, fuel companies and the transport industry, Volvo Trucks is investigating the potential for large-scale investment in DME produced from biomass, a fuel known as Bio-DME.

Unique field test with 14 customers

Volvo Trucks is participating in the project by contributing 14 Volvo FH trucks that will be tested by selected customers at four locations in different parts of Sweden between 2010 and 2012. The first field-test truck is being shown today in Piteå, where the production of Bio-DME will take place in Chemrec’s plant. The Volvo Group, of which Volvo Trucks is a part, is one of the co-owners of Chemrec via its subsidiary, Volvo Technology Transfer.

From a facility beside the Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner pulp plant, the project will produce four tonnes of Bio-DME per day. The raw material used is black liquor, an energy-rich, highly viscous by-product of the pulp industry. Through gasification of the biomass in the black liquor, what emerges is a particularly clean and energy-efficient fuel. The plant is being inaugurated today by the King of Sweden, who is renowned for his keen interest in environmental issues.

“From the holistic viewpoint, Bio-DME is one of the most promising second-generation biofuels. Bio-DME provides both high energy efficiency and low emissions of greenhouse gases. We value these two properties particularly highly as we analyse various possible alternative fuels,” says Lars Mårtensson, environmental affairs director at Volvo Trucks.


Compared with a conventional engine, Bio-DME as a fuel in a diesel engine provides the same high efficiency rating but also a lower noise level. In comparison with diesel fuel, Bio-DME generates 95 percent lower carbon dioxide emissions. What is more, the combustion process produces very low emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. All this makes Bio-DME an ideal fuel for diesel engines.

The entire chain

The field test gets under way in 2010 and encompasses the entire technological chain from biomass to fuel in trucks, in other words including distribution and filling stations. Fuel company Preem will build filling stations so the trucks can be used in regular regional and local operations. The other companies involved in the project are Chemrec, Delphi, ETC, Haldor Topsoe and Total who are contributing as partners.

Inspections and evaluations of the fuel, truck technology, customer perceptions and distribution system will provide answers as to whether Bio-DME may emerge as one of the fuels that can partially reduce dependence on diesel oil.

The project will continue for a specific period and its evaluation as well as the long-term decisions of the authorities will determine whether full-scale industrial production will become reality. The challenges facing new fuels lie primarily in taking a long-term view, producing sufficiently large quantities of biofuels, and handling distribution via a suitably large number of filling stations.

The field test will give us valuable new insight into the potential of Bio-DME as a future vehicle fuel. The project still requires many tests, larger-scale fuel production and an extended infrastructure. And, perhaps most of all, clear guidelines from the authorities on how they view the fuel,” says Volvo Trucks’ President and CEO, Staffan Jufors.